Tag Archives: cinema

Wall-E – 2008 – Andrew Stanton

A rip-off of the charming Johnny-5 from Short Circuit; this is a film firmly for the kids. Simple themes: good versus evil, and love. Can’t argue with that. Cute, but surely not worth much attention. Brian Murray

It’s 2700 and global warming has turned Earth into a wasteland, abandoned by all but adorable robot Wall-E and his cockroach best friend. Life is mundane until a super-sleek fembot is sent out to find signs of life. Despite Disney’s obvious capitalisation of ‘going green,’ the film is irresistibly cute. Cristina Pittelli

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Happy-Go-Lucky – 2008 – Mike Leigh

This is so unlike Mike Leigh’s previous work. It’s also the best British feel-good movie in a while, but somewhere underneath Leigh’s dark and ironic tone definitely lurking. Sally Hawkins in the lead role is so delightful, and Eddie Marsan gives a great performance. Omid Nikfarjam

Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead – 2007 – Sidney Lumet

Families can save you or break you. Lumet’s classic (in every sense of the word) about two dysfunctional brothers, played brilliantly by Philip Seymour Hoffman and Ethan Hawke, who go to extraordinary and violent lengths to rescue their sorry-ass lives by robbing from their parents. A Shakespearean masterpiece. JJ

Schwarze Schafe – 2006 – Oliver Rihs

The most successful production in Berlin after City of Angels, this time without angels, only funny, sad, lucky, fucked up people in the ‘new’ cultural capital of Europe. Five stories to understand how the East sees the West (Germany) or the North the South (Europe). Mario Alemi

Mifune’s Last Song – 1999 – Søren Kragh-Jacobsen

Dogma 95-cinema at its best, Mifune’s storytelling combines unforgiving realism with an erratic charm that leaves you strangely uplifted. Despite the film’s dealing with one of Dogma’s favourite topics – dysfunctional family life – Mifune has a heart-warming quality that turns it into the possibly most unlikely feel-good film ever. Sabine Wolf

Boarding Gate – 2007 – Olivier Assayas

Michael Madsen stars in this average movie about the trials of excesses, and where it leads you. He is a failed financial speculator drawn into a scheme of murder, deceit, and drug-deals. Que event followed by escape to Beijing. Everyone is out to get everyone else,and has their own agenda, leaving only a very unsatisfying ending. Brian Murray